Aerial view of Toledo, Spain

Study & Intern in Toledo

  1. Program Details

    Live and study in a charming Medieval walled city. Improve your Spanish language skills. Intern at banks, governmental bureaus, hospitals, and libraries. Wander the winding streets to discover historical attractions and breathtaking vistas. In your free time, explore the rest of Spain and Europe.

    Location Toledo, Spain
    Term Academic Year, Fall Semester, May Session, Spring Semester, Summer Session
    Housing Dormitory, Homestay
    Credit Type Resident Credit
    Sponsor Learning Abroad Center

    Program Eligibility

    GPA 2.5
    Student Type UofM Students, Non UofM Students
    Student Year Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors
    Language Passed SPAN 1004 (4th semester Spanish) or above
  2.  
  3. About Study & Intern in Toledo

    Live and study in the walled city of Toledo, home for more than 2,000 years to a succession of Roman, Jewish, Visigoth, Moorish and Christian civilizations. Declared a World Heritage Site, Toledo is a living museum, a preserved part of Spanish history where people still live, work and play. A city of approximately 80,000, Toledo offers an environment where you can be immersed in Spanish culture through coursework, internships and daily life.

    This program is offered in collaboration with the prestigious José Ortega-Marañón Foundation and the University of Minnesota. Based at the San Juan de la Penitencia residence, a converted 16th Century convent, the program offers modern learning facilities surrounded by spectacular views of the city, and easy access to the downtown area and public transit. In addition to the opportunity to improve Spanish language ability, the program offers a wide range of courses in the humanities, social sciences and arts. Located just an hour from Madrid, Toledo is an excellent base from which to explore Spain.

    Housing & Meals

    Choose to live either in San Juan de la Penitencia Residence or with a Spanish host family. Each housing option has its own benefits—your choice will depend on your personal preferences and priorities. Housing requests are honored on a first-come, first-served basis. Academic Year students may choose different housing options for each semester and will have the opportunity to change Spring Semester housing plans during Fall Semester in Toledo. Staff members have years of experience coordinating homestays and will be your most valuable resource for questions or problems regarding host families or the Residence.

    Students who participate in the Academic Year session are responsible for housing and meal costs between terms.

    We encourage you to compare host family and residence housing options.

    Student Residence

    Choose from single, double, and triple rooms with shared bathrooms. Residence occupants are almost entirely program participants. The residence includes dining, classroom, library, recreational, laundry facilities, and daily maid service. This option offers convenience and flexibility to come and go as you please. Because the Residencia is within walking distance to virtually everything Toledo has to offer, it is easy to get out into the community and meet Toledanos. Meals are included in the program fee and are taken at the residence.

    Homestay

    For many students, living with a family is their best experience while in Spain. Many students make life-long ties to their families and, through them, can meet other Spaniards. If you choose a homestay, you will have a first-hand look at Spanish culture and society and will be immersed in the Spanish language. Typically, you and your family will live in an apartment, as single family houses are not as common in Europe as in the US. You will have your own room and private study space.

    Many homestays are located outside of old Toledo, approximately seven kilometers from the program facilities. Toledo has a good bus system and homestays students are provided with a bus pass. Meals are included in the program fee and are taken with your host family. If you are unable to go home for lunch, you can sign up to eat with the other participants at the Residence.

    Families are screened very carefully. Upon arrival students will stay in the Residence for approximately one week. During that time students will have the opportunity to meet with the housing placement coordinator to discuss the placement process and to meet the family. If frustrations or concerns arise, the homestay coordinator is there to help you and can even arrange a new family if necessary.

    Excursions

    Four 1-day excursions (3 in summer) are included in the cost of the semester program to provide participants with cultural and historic perspectives of Spain. Visits are made to such sites as Madrid, Aranjuez, Cuenca, the grand El Escorial, Segovia, and the Route of Don Quixote. An optional extended excursion is usually available each semester for an additional fee.

    Flight

    The Learning Abroad Center works with Village Travel, a local travel agency, to arrange a coordinated flight for program participants. The flight is optional, and is arranged for those who want to fly with other program participants. Group flight information is typically available by the program application deadline, if not before.

    Learning Outcomes

    • Strengthen Spanish language skills
    • Deepen crosscultural understanding though interaction with local community
    • Gain Spanish and international perspectives on academic disciplines
    • Increase independence and self-reliance by learning to navigate Spanish society

    Faculty & Staff

    Enjoy individual attention from native Spanish-speaking program faculty who are dedicated to their topics as well as to each participant. Classes are taught by faculty chosen from the staff of the Fundación Ortega-Marañón, the majority of whom hold degrees from renowned American or European universities and/or have experience teaching at such institutions. All faculty are specialists in their academic field and in the field of teaching foreign students.

    About the Learning Abroad Center

    Learning Abroad Center programs are:

    • Affordable: our programs are cost effective.
    • Academically strong: many programs have strong University of Minnesota departmental support and offer pre-approved courses for many majors.
    • Culturally rich: regardless of the program you choose, you will have the opportunity to immerse yourself in the local culture.
    • Expertly managed: our staff in Minnesota and abroad are trained professionals and are always available to answer your questions from extensive pre-departure advising and online orientations to reentry programming. Your safety and well-being are paramount, and we work hard to ensure you have a rewarding and safe experience abroad.
  4.   Homestay Residence
    English vs. Spanish Immerse yourself in a Spanish-speaking environment where you will be forced to speak with native speakers. There will be many temptations to speak English instead of Spanish. Few native Spanish speakers in the Residence makes it somewhat harder to meet Spaniards and speak Spanish
    How do I meet Spaniards? Experience the daily life of Spaniards from a first-hand perspective, with the chance to learn more about culture and society. Develop life-long ties to your family. Live and eat with many Americans. You must get out into the city and meet people to integrate into Spanish life.
    How much does it cost? Pay an additional fee (unless your home institution absorbs this cost). The homestay fee is non-refundable. Complete cost is included in your program fee.
    Where will I live? Most host families live outside old Toledo, approximately seven kilometers from the program facilities. Live in the same building as the dining hall and classrooms in the center of old Toledo.
    What's my commute like? Get some exercise! The commute can be 10–30 minutes or more one way. After dark you can catch a taxi. All homestay students also receive bus passes. No commute to class. Walk down the hall to the dining room and classrooms.
    Do I have my own room? Enjoy a single room and private workspace away from the noise of dorm life. You might have roommates who are not native Spanish speakers. You can choose between single, double or triple. You may not get your first choice in room type.
    Can I use the landline phone? No phone calls are allowed without expressed permission from your family. A public pay phone in the residence is available for all participants.
    What will I eat? Home-cooked food! If it is inconvenient to return home for lunch, you can request a to-go lunch or eat at the Residence. The cafeteria offers a salad bar, main entree, dessert, and beverage.
    What if I don't like the food? Living in a new culture means trying new foods. You will need to adjust to the diet and meal schedule of your family. Living in a new culture means trying new foods. A different meal is prepared each day, with a salad bar as an alternate option.
    I want to be independent. You come and go as you please but should inform the family of your schedule. You come and go and you please but can only eat meals at designated times.
    I want to go out at night. Enjoy the nightlife! Walk or take a taxi with other home students who live in your neighborhood. Enjoy the nightlife! The Residence closes at 6:30 a.m., so you will not need to inform someone about a late night.
    Where can I hang out during the day? Study, relax, or socialize in the Residence lounge and cafeteria. Study, relax, or socialize in the Residence lounge and cafeteria.
    Overnight guests You are not allowed to stay overnight at the Residence, and overnight guests are discouraged at the homestay. Talk to your family about specific rules. No overnight non-Residence guests are permitted in your room. Visiting guests may pay to stay overnight in the Residence with advance arrangements.
    What if I don't like my housing option? If conflicts arise, you can switch to another family, or if necessary, the Residence. If you want to switch to a homestay, talk to the housing coordinator and LAC contact.
    On-site support The housing coordinator will help you and can even arrange a new family if necessary. The housing coordinator will help you and can resolve any issue you might have.
  5. Program Structure

    Program Type Study Abroad Center
    Program Level 3000 level courses
    Courseload

    13–18 credits per semester, 3 credits for May session or 6–9 credits for summer session. Classes are held Monday–Thursday on the semester and summer program, leaving long weekends for cultural immersion.

    Students are required to maintain a minimum of 13 credit enrollment status per semester or maintain the minimum program credit enrollment determined by their study abroad program, whichever is greater. Grades earned on study abroad programs (for UMN resident credit) are converted to UMN A-F grades according to pre-established grade conversion criteria, if necessary. 

    Coursework

    Semester or Summer Program

    Courses cover a wide range of topics, including anthropology, archaeology, art history, economics, history, interdisciplinary studies, linguistics, political science, Spanish cultural heritage, Spanish language, Spanish and Latin American literature, women's studies, Spanish theatre and business.

    View the Course list for a complete list of classes offered. 

    You may also take classes at la Universidad de Castilla la Mancha for an additional cost. Courses are available in environmental science, sport science, history, art history, philosophy, psychology, geography and other areas. There is an additional fee to enroll in courses at the university. Students should also plan to stay beyond the official end date of the program as the university term ends after the program end date.

    University of Minnesota students could complete 4 courses towards a Spanish Studies minor in one semester of study in Toledo. Most courses in Toledo count toward requirements for the Spanish major. Contact the Spanish and Portuguese Studies Advising office for more information.

    May Session

    Tracing Three Cultures (TLDO 3024) explores the cultural heritage of Toledo. This three-week, 3 credit, intensive course combines in-class lectures and discussions with regular field trips and excursions to museums and monuments, including Madrid's Museo del Prado and guided tours of Judaic Toledo and Mozarabic Segovia. 

  6. All courses are taught in Spanish and are 3 credits, unless indicated otherwise.

    Instructions for the Course Selection Form

    Fall or Spring Semester

    • Semester students are required to maintain a minimum of 13 credits per semester.
    • Total registration must equal 13 to 18 credits (approximately four or five classes).
    • List classes in order of preference so that the on-site staff is better able to accommodate your choices.
    • List two to three alternate classes in case your first choices are not offered.
    • Contact Amy Garwood-Díaz if you would like to take a class at Universidad Castilla la Mancha.
    • The internship and community engagement course cannot be taken during the same semester.
    • If you plan to take the internship or community engagement course, you must also complete the corresponding application form.
    • Internships and community engagement cannot be listed as alternates.
    • If you would like to take the 1-credit Global Identity course, list that on your form.

    May

    • Total registration should equal 3 credits.
    • Only one course is offered during May session. Write in the name of the course (TLDO 3024 Tracing Three Cultures).

    Summer

    • Total registration must equal 6–10 credits.
    • Choose to take classes, an internship, or a combination of the two. 
    • If you plan to take classes only (no internship), list 2–3 courses as well as alternates in case your first choices are not offered.
    • If you enroll in the 3-credit internship course, list Internships in Spain and one additional course for a total of 6 credits.
    • If you plan on doing an internship, list two distinct areas on the Internship Application.

    Course Planning Links

    Courses

    Spanish Studies Core

    Spanish Composition & Communication
    TLDO 3231
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    4 Credits

    Difficult aspects of Spanish grammar and structures are mastered through composition writing. Analyses problems of style as well as language. Several compositions are written outside class each week and common errors are reviewed.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3015

    Approved for the Global Perspectives theme.

    Syllabus for Spanish Composition & Communication (PDF)

    Business Courses

    Marketing in European Business
    TLDO 3004
    Spring & Summer
    3 Credits

    The main purpose of this course is to study principle marketing concepts, focusing on Spanish and European companies. Other topics that will be explored: pricing decisions, branding strategies, distribution, communication, marketing plans & more.

    Notes from CSOM: approved for a Marketing Elective (major or minor) and the International Business co-major (depth course)

    Approved for the Global Perspectives theme.

    Syllabus for Marketing in European Business (PDF)

    Spanish for Business
    TLDO 3022
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    3 Credits

    In this course, students will learn the vocabulary associated with various aspects of business, especially those associated with finding a job, as well as learning about Spanish work culture, the economy, and labor relations among other topics.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3022

    Notes from CSOM: can be used in the International Business major (Depth)

    Approved for the Global Perspectives theme.

    Syllabus for Spanish for Business (PDF)

    Cross Cultural Business: Business in Spain and the US Compared
    TLDO 3023
     
    3 Credits

    Analyze the contemporary business environment of Spain: social, economic and political context, labor market, financial markets, legal framework and the impact of the European single market.

    Approved for the Global Perspectives theme.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3022

    Notes from CSOM: can be used in the International Business major (Depth or SC Breadth)

    Syllabus for Cross Cultural Business: Business in Spain and the US Compared (PDF)

    Management of Cultural Heritage
    TLDO 3239
    Spring
    3 Credits

    In this course the idea of cultural heritage will be introduced and analyzed from the perspective of the western world. Cultural heritage will be conceived as the set of material and immaterial goods which have been inherited from the past, are enjoyed in the present, and that are worth preserving for generations to come. In addition to learning about Spain’s cultural heritage, student will learn about the measures put in place to protect and preserve that Heritage.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3510

    Notes from CSOM: can be used in the International Business major  (SC Breadth)

    Approved for the Global Perspectives theme.

    Syllabus for Management of Cultural Heritage (PDF)

    Spain and the European Union
    TLDO 3238
    Fall, Spring, & Summer
    3 Credits

    Study the process of the formation of the EU and the impact of building a single European market on the Spanish and greater European economies. Readings from the daily press are used in class.

    Approved for the Social Science core and Global Perspectives theme.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3510

    Notes from CSOM: can be used in the International Business major (Depth)

    Notes from Economics Department: can be used as an Area Studies course: ECON 3970

    Syllabus for Spain and the European Union (PDF)

    Critical Analysis Courses

    Art of Reading Literary Texts
    TLDO 3104W
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    3 Credits

    Critical reading of Spanish and Spanish-American texts; works representing principal genres — novel, drama, poetry, essay — diverse approaches to literature. Terminology of criticism, literary problems and techniques.

    Approved for the Literature core and Global Perspectives theme.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3104.

    Approved for the writing intensive liberal education requirement.

    Syllabus for Art of Reading Literary Texts (PDF)

    The Cultural Heritage of Spain
    TLDO 3105W
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    3 Credits

    Overview of main periods of Spanish history highlighting political, social, anthropological and economic characteristics of each one. Second half of course examines Spanish culture and society from the beginning of the Franco regime in 1939 until the present. Cultural trends in literature and the arts are analyzed in relation to social phenomena.

    Approved for the Arts & Humanities core and Global Perspectives theme.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3105.

    Approved for the writing intensive liberal education requirement.

    Syllabus for The Cultural Heritage of Spain (PDF)

    Introduction to the Study of Hispanic Linguistics
    TLDO 3107W
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    3 credits

    Study of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, lexicology, pragmatics, discourse analysis, sociolinguistics and history of the Spanish language. Also introduces you to the study of Hispanic linguistics as a discipline in relation to social, cultural and literary studies.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3107.

    Approved for the writing intensive liberal education requirement.

    Approved for the Global Perspectives theme.

    Syllabus for Introduction to the Study of Hispanic Linguistics (PDF)

    Literature Electives

    20th Century Spanish Literature
    TLDO 3001
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    3 Credits

    Contemporary Spanish literature from the Generation of 1898 to the postwar era. Discussion of the current and past political and social events that shaped literature and representative authors and works.

    Approved for the Literature core and Global Perspectives theme.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3212.

    Syllabus for 20th Century Spanish Literature (PDF)

    Survey of Spanish America Colonial Literature
    TLDO 3002
    Spring
    3 Credits

    Survey of major works form the Colonial periods to Independence and Romanticism. Texts by Bernal Diaz del Castillo, Fray Bartolome de las Casas, Garcilaso de la Vega, Alonso de Ercilla, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, Jose Joaquin Fernandez de Lizardi, Esteban Echevarria and Jorge Isaacs.

    Approved for the Literature core and Global Perspectives theme.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3221

    Syllabus for Survey of Spanish America Colonial Literature (PDF)

    Writers of the Spanish Empire and Its Decline
    TLDO 3211
    Fall
    3 Credits

    Masterpieces of Spain's most significant Renaissance and Golden Age writers, including Lope de Vega, Calderón, Cervantes, Garcilaso, Góngora, Quevedo & the authors of picaresque novels and mystic poetry.

    Approved for the Literature core and Global Perspectives theme.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3211

    Syllabus for Writers of the Spanish Empire and Its Decline (PDF)

    Spanish Golden Age Theatre
    TLDO 3215
    Spring
    3 credits

    Spanish Baroque Theater. Plays by Lope de Vega, Cervantes, Tirso de Molina, Calderon de la Barca or Luis Velez de Guevara are read and discussed in class. Students attend the theater either in Toledo or Madrid.

    Approved for the Literature core and Global Perspectives theme.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3910.

    Syllabus for Spanish Golden Age Theatre (PDF)

    Seminar: Narrative in Spanish America
    TLDO 3222
    Fall
    3 credits

    Current narratives in Spanish America from Carpentier and the emergence of magical realism to the present day. Authors studied include García Márquez, Borges, Fuentes, Vargas Llosa, Cortázar and others.

    Approved for the Literature core and Global Perspectives theme.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3222.

    Syllabus for Seminar: Narrative in Spanish America (PDF)

    Culture Electives

    Camino de Santiago: Then & Now
    TLDO 3006
    Fall, Spring
    3 credits

    The Camino de Santiago constitutes a cultural landmark that links Spain’s medieval past with the recovery of its use in the present. In this course, students will be immersed in Spanish and European medieval society, learn about the exceptional patrimonial importance of the primary Camino de Santiago – the “Camino Francés,” and examine the new forms of use that the Camino represents today.

    Equivalent to SPAN 3510.

    Approved for the Global Perspectives theme.

    Syllabus for Camino de Santiago (PDF)

    Tracing Three Cultures: The Christian, Muslim and Jewish Legacy in Architecture, Literature and Painting
    TLDO 3024
    May
    3 Credits

    Explores the cultural heritage of Toledo through in-class lectures and discussions with regular field trips and excursions to museums and monuments, including Madrid's Museo del Prado and guided tours of Judaic Toledo and Mozarabic Segovia. We will study the traces of Christian, Muslim and Jewish culture in literature and art and the way they conform with the current identity of modern Spain. The course focuses on three areas. The first one is the Sephardic heritage in literature and architecture in Toledo. The second one is the interaction between Islamic and Hispano-Mozarabic artists. The third one is the role it has had in Spanish folklore and traditions from music and festivals to food.

    Approved for Arts and Humanities core and Global Perspectives theme.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3510

    Syllabus for Tracing Three Cultures (PDF)

    Art and Architecture in Spain: Periods and Styles
    TLDO 3232
    Summer
    3 credits

    Characteristics of major periods in Spanish art and architecture including Greek and Roman, Romanesque, Gothic, Baroque and Neo-Classical. Also Romanticism, Modernism and 20th Century avant-garde styles.

    Approved for the Arts and Humanities core and Global Perspectives theme.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3510

    Syllabus for Art and Architecture in Spain (PDF)

    Christian, Muslim, Jewish Art: Toledo
    TLDO 3233
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    3 Credits

    The art of the three cultures, which determined the national character of Spain today, are studied in and around Toledo, which represented the maximum synthesis of this unique heritage.

    Approved for the Arts and Humanities core and Global Perspectives theme.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3510

    Syllabus for Christian, Muslim, Jewish Art (PDF)

    Master Painters of Spain
    TLDO 3234
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    3 credits

    Development of Spanish painting studied in works of five of Spain's greatest artists: El Greco, Velázquez, Goya, Picasso and Dalí. Visits to Madrid’s Museo del Prado and Centro de Arte Reina Sofía.

    Approved for the Arts and Humanities core and Global Perspectives theme.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3510

    Syllabus for Master Painters of Spain (PDF)

    Politics and Society in Latin America
    TLDO 3235
    Fall, Spring
    3 credits

    Contrasts political and social structures in various Spanish-American nations in the 20th Century to show their diversity, but also to provide insight into common problems they share.

    Approved for the Social Science core and Global Perspectives theme.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3512

    Syllabus for Politics and Society in Latin America (PDF)

    History and Memory
    TLDO 3242
    Spring
    3 credits

    Improve Spanish language skills, knowledge of recent Spanish history & the role of oral testimonies in history research by meeting and conversing with the elderly. The final objective of the course is for students to create a Memory Archive with digital recordings of the interviews.

    Approved for Historical Perspectives core and Global Perspectives theme.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3510

    Syllabus for History and Memory (PDF)

    Ethnology and Folklore of the Iberian Peninsula
    TLDO 3302
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    3 credits

    Traditional forms of life in the Iberian Peninsula in terms of social and economic features as well as literary, artistic and religious aspects.

    Approved for the Social Science core and Global Perspectives theme.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3510

    Syllabus for Ethnology and Folklore of the Iberian Peninsula (PDF)

    Spain Since 1936
    TLDO 3502
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    3 credits

    Main and social significance of Franco's authoritarian regime as opposed to the German and Italian models. Origins of the Civil War and later social and economic development. Problems in the political and constitutional transition since Franco.

    Approved for the Historical Perspectives core and Global Perspectives theme.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3502.

    Syllabus for Spain Since 1936 (PDF)

    Theology of Spanish Mysticism
    TLDO 3515
    Fall, Spring
    3 credits

    Historical, social, cultural and theological basis of Spanish mysticism. The three main groups studied are the Carmelites, Franciscans and Jesuits.

    Approved for the Arts and Humanities core and Global Perspectives theme.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3510

    Syllabus for Theology of Spanish Mysticism (PDF)

    Spanish Philosophical Thought
    TLDO 3516
    Fall
    3 credits

    Three-part course: Characteristics of the Spanish Renaissance (16th century); influence of Erasmus, mysticism and philosophy of Juan Luis Vives, overview of philosophical development from 17th to 20th centuries; and contemporary Spanish philosophy, with focus on Unamuno, Ortega-Marañón and Zubiri.

    Approved for the Arts and Humanities core and Global Perspectives theme.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3510

    Syllabus for Spanish Philosophical Thought (PDF)

    Introduction to the History and Present Situation of Spanish Women
    TLDO 3517
    Spring
    3 credits

    A theoretical and practical approach to the fundamental transformations that have conditioned the lives of Spanish women from the Golden Age to the present. Concentrates on aspects of their participation in the economic world and in the culture.

    Approved for the Historical Perspectives core and Global Perspectives theme.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3510

    Syllabus for Introduction to the History and Present Situation of Spanish Women (PDF)

    Recent Spanish Film
    TLDO 3810
    Fall, Spring,Summer
    3 credits

    Study the role of Spanish movies as a form of collective reflection and as a reflection of 20th century mass society. Cinematographic analysis of ten films permits the understanding of essential aspects of Spanish culture, history and society. Includes works by Carlos Saura, Alejandro Amenabar and Pedro Almodovar.

    Approved for the Arts and Humanities core and Global Perspectives and Technology and Society themes.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3800

    Syllabus for Recent Spanish Film (PDF)

    Transition to Democracy
    TLDO 3237
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    3 Credits

    In this course, students will learn about 20th century Spain and the political turmoil of this period including the Second Republic, the Spanish Civil War, Franco’s regime, the eventual transition into the democratic nation we know today, along with the social, political, and economic changes that accompanied this transition.

    Approved for the Social Sciences core and Global Perspectives theme.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3510

    Syllabus for Transition to Democracy (PDF)

    20th Century Spanish Art
    TLDO 3314
    Summer
    3 credits

    This course presents the principal artists and movements of the 20th century in Spain and their relationship to avant-garde Europe. A series of styles and authors will be studied, from modernism at the beginning of the 20th century to the artistic tendencies of the final decade of that century. Due to the range of the material, the methodology will be based on knowledge of the principal artistic concepts, and the students’ reflections on each of those topics.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3510

    Approved for the Global Perspectives theme.

    Syllabus for 20th Century Spanish Art (PDF)

    Linguistics Electives

    Spanish Phonetics
    TLDO 3236
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    3 credits

    Practical as well as theoretical aspects of Spanish phonetics geared towards correcting specific pronunciation problems of the non-native speaker. Students are divided into small practice groups according to their native languages.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3701.

    Approved for the Global Perspectives theme.

    Syllabus for Spanish Phonetics (PDF)

    Colloquial Spanish
    TLDO 3706
    Fall, Spring
    3 credits

    Characteristic phenomena of the Spanish language in its colloquial spoken form. Variations based on age, social and regional background, etc. New lexical, morphological and syntactical coinages.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3730

    Approved for the Global Perspectives theme.

    Syllabus for Colloquial Spanish (PDF)

    Additional Electives

    (Spanish Studies Majors: select in consultation with departmental advising; restrictions apply)

    Advanced Spanish Conversation
    TLDO 3230
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    3 credits

    Classroom discussions centering on contemporary issues in Spain and other subjects of interest. Periodic error evaluation and systematic review of the most frequent structural and grammatical problems.

    Approved for the Global Perspectives theme.

    U of M Spanish Department Equivalent:  SPAN 3699 (Spanish Studies elective without a Critical Analysis prerequisite).  Effective Summer 2017.

    Syllabus for Advanced Spanish Conversation (PDF)

    Community Engagement and the Immigrant Experience in Spain
    TLDO 3975
    Fall, Spring
    3 Credits

    Immigration in Spain has grown tremendously in recent decades and has become an important political, social and economic issue. In this course students will volunteer at one of several Toledo institutions related to the immigration phenomenon in Spain, collaborating directly either with the immigrant population or with Spaniards who work with the immigrant community. A weekly classroom seminar will further explore the students' volunteer experiences through related readings, discussion, reflection and presentations.

    Approved for the Global Perspectives theme.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3401 

    Syllabus for Community Engagement and the Immigrant Experience in Spain (PDF)

    Internships in Spain
    TLDO 3970
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    3 Credits

    Experiential learning in many fields, coupled with a classroom component, which deepens your understanding of the meaning of work in Spain and of the social organizational structure and culture of the workplace.

    Approved for the Global Perspectives theme.

    UofM Spanish Department equivalent: elective without a Critical Analysis prerequisite beginning Summer 2018.  

    Syllabus for Internships in Spain (PDF)

    Global Identity
    OLPD 3330
    Fall & Spring
    1 Credit

    Global Identity: Connecting Your International Experience with Your Future is an optional online course that helps you process your overseas experience and apply what you've learned upon your return. The course assists you in reflecting on multiple layers of cross-cultural experience and marketing your study abroad experience for future goals.  This course is offered for an additional fee. Registration Instructions will be emailed to all students who are going abroad, via the Learning Abroad Center.

    Approved for the Global Perspectives theme

    Public Health Courses

    Comparative Public Health
    TLDO 3007
    Spring
    3 Credits

    Public health systems are facing an increasing number of challenges: the pressures of globalization, aging populations, and the increase in patient lawsuits, as well as the high costs of medical research and treatments. With these issues in mind, we must critically analyze the manner in which medical care is provided in different systems so that we can design and adapt systems that provide high quality, effective, and efficient health care. Changes made to health care systems are frequently based on economic and political considerations, and many countries are currently experiencing significant challenges in health care that depart from the way their health care has been financed and provided in the past.

    This course will introduce students to the Spanish health care system and the context in which it is developing, studying the key changes that have taken place up to the present day. Based on a series of case studies, students will be able to compare the Spanish health care model with other models like those of the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Sweden, and/or developing nations.

    Approved for the Global Perspectives theme.

    Syllabus for Comparitive Public Health (PDF)

    Medical Spanish
    TLDO 3xxx
    Fall, Spring & Summer
    3 Credits

    Course description coming soon

    Syllabus coming soon

    Directed Studies Courses

    These courses are offered spring semester to academic year students only and are equivalent to SPAN 3970 unless otherwise indicated.

    Directed Studies in Literature
    TLDO 3217
    Spring
    3 Credits
    Individual research projects or readings in literature, under faculty direction, to meet objectives not covered by the regular curriculum.
    Directed Studies in Art History
    TLDO 3241
    Spring
    3 Credits
    Individual research projects or readings in art or archeology, under faculty direction, to meet objectives not covered by the regular curriculum.
    Directed Studies in Anthropology and Archaeology
    TLDO 3303
    Spring
    3 Credits
    Individual research projects or readings in anthropology or archeology, under faculty direction, to meet objectives not covered by the regular curriculum.
    Directed Studies in History
    TLDO 3503
    Spring
    3 Credits
    Individual research projects or readings in history, under faculty direction, to meet objectives not covered by the regular curriculum.
    Advanced Individualized Spanish Language Study
    TLDO 3699
    Fall & Spring
    3 Credits

    Directed study combined with individual tutoring to improve specific language skills identified through mutual agreement of student and supervising professor.

    U of M Spanish Department equivalent: SPAN 3699 (for minors only)

  7. Participating in an internship is a great way to immerse yourself in Spanish culture while gaining work experience. Internships are available during the semester (3 credits) or summer (3 credits) and include an academic seminar.

    Semester students who have an internship should be prepared to work 7-8 hours per week at their site. Summer students should be prepared to spend 15 hours per week at the internship site.

    Examples of internship sites include the Regional Parliament, museums, newspapers, Toledo City Hall, schools, radio stations, community service organizations and a physical rehabilitation hospital. Internship site descriptions are available for the semester program and summer program

    Selection for the internship requires successful completion of the internship application and an on-site interview. 

    Student Experiences

    Elizabeth Interns in Toledo

    Police Report

    A police report is required for students doing an internship in Toledo. We will not be able to place you in an internship without a police report. 

    A police report is a background check stating whether you have a criminal history. Different governmental agencies or police departments refer to this document as a background check. Explain that you need the document in order to provide a record of any violations that you may have in order to participate in an internship abroad. The document you receive varies by jurisdiction. 

    Have the background check completed before you depart for Toledo and bring the document with you in your carry-on. This document can be in English.

    If you live outside the Minneapolis/St. Paul area you should check with the local governmental agency or police department in your hometown. Some local police departments may require your personal appearance in order to conduct the search. 

    Minneapolis-St. Paul Area

    Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension

    Minnesota Justice Information Services—CHA

    1430 Maryland Ave. E.  

    St. Paul, MN 55106

    You can find additional information at the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension website.

  8. Semester students have the opportunity to take TLDO 3975 Community Engagement and the Immigrant Experience in Spain. In this course, work with one of several Toledo institutions related to the immigration phenomenon in Spain, collaborating directly either with the immigrant population or with the Spaniards who are working with immigrants. Connect your experience working three hours per week with these organizations with the seminar portion of the course. Readings, discussion and debate in the classroom help you better understand the important issue of immigration in Spain. At the end of the course, a workshop day is held to which collaborating institutions, students, and residents of Toledo are invited.

    Police Report

    A police report is required for students doing community engagement in Toledo. We will not be able to place you in a community engagement site without a police report. 

    A police report is a background check stating whether you have a criminal history. Different governmental agencies or police departments refer to this document as a background check. Explain that you need the document in order to provide a record of any violations that you may have in order to participate in community engagement abroad. The document you receive varies by jurisdiction. 

    Have the background check completed before you depart for Toledo and bring the document with you in your carry-on. This document can be in English.

    If you live outside the Minneapolis/St. Paul area you should check with the local governmental agency or police department in your hometown. Some local police departments may require your personal appearance in order to conduct the search. 

    Minneapolis-St. Paul Area

    Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension

    Minnesota Justice Information Services–CHA

    1430 Maryland Ave. E.  

    St. Paul, MN 55106

    You can find additional information at the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension website.

  9. Dates & Deadlines

    Submit the online application and complete the assigned application checklist according to the appropriate deadline:
    Program Term App Open Date Deadline*
    Spring 2020 May 1 Extended to October 15, 2019
    Arrival Jan 22
    Orientation, Placement Testing, Internship Interview Jan 23
    Guided visit of Toledo Jan 24
    Classes Begin Jan 27
    Excursion to Madrid Jan 31
    Excursion to El Escorial Feb 14
    Midterm Exams Mar 2 – 5
    Optional excursion to Andalucia Mar 13 – 15
    Excursion to Ruta del Quijote Mar 27
    Holy Week (no classes) Apr 3 – 12
    Excursion to Segovia Apr 17
    Final Exams May 4 – 7
    Closing Ceremony May 9
    Departure May 10
    May Session 2020 Aug 1 Mar 15
    Arrival May 21
    Orientation May 22
    Excursion to Madrid May 29
    Excursion to Segovia Jun 5
    Final Exam Jun 8
    Final Day of Program Jun 9
    May + Summer Session 2020 Aug 1 Mar 15
    Arrival May 21
    Orientation May 22
    Excursion to Madrid May 29
    Excursion to Segovia Jun 5
    Final Exams Jun 8
    Orientation begins Jun 16
    Guided visit of Toledo Jun 17
    First day of class Jun 18
    Excursion to Madrid Jun 19
    Optional excursion to Andalucia Jul 3 – 5
    Excursion to Segovia Jul 10
    Excursion to El Escorial Jul 17
    Final exams Jul 22 – 23
    Closing ceremony Jul 25
    Departure to US Jul 27
    Summer Session 2020 Aug 1 Apr 20
    Arrival Jun 15
    Orientation, Placement Testing, & Internship Interview Jun 16
    Guided visit of Toledo Jun 17
    First day of Class Jun 18
    Excursion to Madrid Jun 19
    Optional excursion to Andalucia Jul 3 – 5
    Excursion to Segovia Jul 10
    Excursion to El Escorial Jul 17
    Final exams Jul 22 – 23
    Closing ceremony Jul 25
    Departure Jul 27
    Fall Semester 2019 Dec 1 Apr 20
    Arrival Sep 6
    Orientation, Placement Testing, & Welcoming Ceremony Sep 7
    Guided Tour of Toledo, Welcome Dinner Sep 8
    Classes begin Sep 9
    Excursion to Madrid Sep 13
    Optional trip to Avila and Salamanca Oct 4 – 6
    Excursion to Alcala de Henares Oct 18
    Midterm Exams Oct 21 – 24
    Fall Break Oct 25 – 29
    Classes Resume Oct 30
    Excursion to El Escorial Nov 8
    Excursion to Segovia Nov 15
    Final Exams Dec 5 – 11
    Closing Ceremony Dec 13
    Departure Dec 15

    *Program dates are subject to change. Contact the LAC for verification of dates before purchasing your airfare.
    **If the deadline falls on a weekend, submit your materials on the following business day.

    Orientation Dates & Locations

    Orientation will be conducted in 2 parts: an online orientation, which is mandatory for all students, and an in-person, program-specific session. You will receive more information about the online orientation via email. Failure to complete the online orientation will impact your ability to go abroad.

    See below for tentative dates and times for your in-person session. You will be notified of the official date and time via email. Participants will receive applicable orientation materials via email approximately 1 week prior to the in-person session.

    Term Abroad Date/Time Location
    Spring 2020 Monday, November 18th; 2:30-5:30pm Carlson School 1-147
  10. Fees for Study & Intern in Toledo

    University of Minnesota participants pay the program fee instead of on-campus tuition and fees for the term they are abroad.

    May Session 2019 Program Fees

    DormHomestay

    May & Summer Session 2019 Program Fees

    DormHomestay

    Summer Session 2019 Program Fees

    DormHomestay

    Fall Semester 2019 Program Fees

    DormHomestayCombined Homestay/Dorm

    Spring Semester 2020 Program Fees

    Dorm, HomestayCombined Homestay/Dorm

    Academic Year 2017-2018 Program Fees

    DormHomestayCombined Homestay/Dorm

    If you do not see a budget estimate for the term you intend to go abroad, the fee has not yet been finalized. We strive to post fees for this program at least 30 days prior to the application deadline. The Learning Abroad Center will delay the posting of some fees until enrollments, inflation and exchange rates are determined. Note the average increase in fees will be 3–10%. Program fees are based on estimates and may change depending on international economic factors.

    Fees or tuition from home institutions may be added to or differ from the University of Minnesota Learning Abroad Center fees listed on this page.

    Billing & Payments

    Visit Billing for information about the billing process for application fees, deposits, and program fees.

    Financial Aid & Scholarships

    Visit Financial Information for information on using financial aid and scholarships for study abroad.

    Bridging Loan

    Bridging Loan, a no-interest/no-fees loan that funds the upfront deposit and flights costs, is available for this program for eligible students.

    Cancellation Policy

    Before you apply to or confirm your participation on this program, review the Learning Abroad Center's Cancellation Policy to inform yourself of the timeline and financial obligations for canceling.
  11. Prepare

    Complete pre-application advising.

    Be aware: All programs require a $50 application fee. This fee will be charged to your student account upon submission of an online application.

    To complete the online application for this program, you will need to select or provide the following information on the online application:

    Center Name TC Learning Abroad Ctr
    Education Abroad Term See Dates page for term options
    Program Name Study & Intern in Toledo
    Track Name Study & Intern in Toledo
    Country Spain

    Submit

    University of Minnesota Student—apply

    Use your University of Minnesota internet ID and password to log into the Education Abroad application system. Your student account will be charged a $50 application fee.

    Non-University of Minnesota Student—apply

    Once you submit your application, Learning Abroad Center staff will create a University of Minnesota student internet account for you. You will use this account to access the Education Abroad Application System, and other University of Minnesota services. You will be charged a $50 application fee for this program.

    Our staff will contact you within 2–3 business days with your internet account information, and additional application instructions.

    Complete

    After you submit your application, you will receive an email notification confirming that your application was received.  Submitted applications are assigned an application checklist, which will include the following items:

    • Course Selection Form (meet with your academic adviser(s) to ensure appropriate courses are chosen)
    • Transcript (Non-UofM students only)
    • Toledo Internship Application (Required only for internship applicants)
    • Toledo Community Engagement Application (Required only for community engagement applicants)
    • Toledo Universidad de Castilla la Mancha Application (Required only for applicants planning to take additional coursework at the Universidad)
    • Home Institution Nomination (Non-UofM students only)

    Detailed descriptions and instructions for submitting each checklist item are included on the application checklist assigned to you. 

    If you do not meet the GPA requirement for this program you will be required to submit two additional application items—the Low GPA Essay and Special Circumstances Recommendation. Both items will be added to your checklist after you start your application, and you will be notified when they have been added.

    Application Review Process

    After your application checklist is complete, your application is reviewed by our program team. You will be notified of an acceptance decision by email. If accepted, you will have two weeks to confirm your spot on the program.  Once confirmed, you will have additional required forms to complete before participating in the program.  If you decide not to continue with the application process, log into the online application system and submit a Cancel Request.

  12. Passport

    You must obtain a passport to enter Spain. Your passport must be valid for at least seven months after your return to the US. US citizens spending fewer than 90 days in Europe will only need a passport. A Spanish tourist visa, which is valid for 90 days, is automatically issued to all US citizens who enter Spain. If you have not already obtained your passport, see Passports for more information.

    Visa

    US citizens participating on the Sutdy & Intern in Toledo, Study & Intern in Madrid, or Psychology & Research in Madrid programs for a semester or year, or US citizens staying in Spain for more than 90 days, must obtain a student visa. US citizens participating in May or Summer session do not need a visa. Non-US citizens should check with the Spanish embassy to determine any special regulations pertaining entry into Spain at any time.

    Remember to read all information that you receive regarding student visas carefully. Requirements could change at any time and can vary from consulate to consulate.

    University of Minnesota Visa Service

    The Spanish consulate in Chicago has graciously granted the University of Minnesota the ability to both drop off Spanish student visa applications and pick up the completed student visas on behalf of students studying abroad in Toledo and Madrid. 

    This is an optional service, and is only available to students on the Toledo and Madrid programs. Each student MUST inform the Learning Abroad Center of his or her plans for obtaining the student visa whether they chose to use this service or not.

    Using the Visa Service
    • If you use the visa service, a $75 fee will be assessed to your University of Minnesota account. This fee will not be listed separately on your student account. It will be added to the overall program fee.
    • The deadline to use this service comes quickly after the program application deadline. To use the service, University of Minnesota–Twin Cities students must attend an appointment with the Spanish visa adviser to drop of visa application materials before the deadline.
    • If you live outside of the Twin Cities area, you must set up a phone meeting with Amy Garwood-Díaz or the student visa specialist prior to sending in your visa application materials via FedEx.
    • Only complete visa applications will be accepted. If you fail to include one or more of the necessary pieces to receive your visa when you present your visa application to the Learning Abroad Center, you will have to return at a later time with your complete visa application. 
    • If you live outside of the state of Minnesota, completed visas can be returned to the student via Fed Ex once picked up from the Chicago Spanish Consulate by the UofM.
    Not Using the Visa Service
    • If you choose to apply on your own and live within the Chicago consulate's jurisdiction, you will need to make at least one in person appearance at the Spanish consulate. For example, if you have someone drop of your materials on your behalf, then YOU must pick up your passport in person. If you drop off your materials and want your passport returned by mail, you must bring in a self-addressed, pre-paid envelope. The consulate only accepts Express Mail from the US Postal Service with appropriate postage. No other carrier service is accepted.
    • If you are not within the Chicago consulate's jurisdiction, check with the consulate within your jurisdiction, as requirements and procedures may differ.

    Visa Application Requirements

    To date, the following items are required to apply for a student visa through the Chicago consulate. 

    • Two copies of signed and completed National application—the Step-by-Step Instructions will assist you in completing the visa application
    • Original, signed passport
    • Money Order for $160 payable to the Consulate of Spain. This can be purchased at a Post Office or bank. You must pay with a debit card or cash. More information can be found at USPS—Money Orders.
    • Two photocopies of the information and photo page of your passport
    • Two photocopies of US driver's license, US state ID or voter registration card
    • Two US passport-style photos, white background, 2x2", glued to the upper right hand corner of the National application and copy
    • Letter of acceptance—this serves as proof of admission, medical insurance, & financial means (Provided by the Learning Abroad Center to all students, regardless if you are using our visa service or not.)
    • Acknowledgement Letter - (Provided by the Learning Abroad Center to all students)
    • If you are using the Learning Abroad Center visa service, you will also need a notarized letter granting the University of Minnesota permission to pick up and drop off your visa materials (use template provided). Do NOT sign the letter before meeting with the notary public.

    Academic Year students (students going for more than one semester) must also provide the following:

    • Medical Statement: A doctor’s recent statement, on doctor's or medical center's letterhead, indicating that the student has been examined and found to be free of communicable diseases and in good physical and mental health to travel and study abroad (make your appointment early.)
    • Background Check
      • The Spanish consualte allows students to obtain State background checks, which are generally easier to obtain. Students from Minnesota can obtain their background check from the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension. In addition to this background check, students will have to obtain an Apostille from the Secretary of State's office to verify its authenticity.
      • Students can obtain an FBI background check, though it is not recommended because it may take between 3 to 8 weeks to receive.

    Step-by-Step Instructions to complete the Application for a National Visa

    1. Last name.
    2. If you have changed your last name (through marriage for example), former last name.
    3. First and middle names.
    4. Date of birth (day-month-year).
    5. Place of birth.
    6. Country where you were born.
    7. Your nationality. (If you were born in the US, put US). If you have not always been a US citizen indicate your nationality at birth.
    8. Gender.
    9. Marital status.
    10. This section is not applicable. Leave blank.
    11. This section is not applicable. Leave blank.
    12. Type of travel document. Check 'Ordinary Passport'.
    13. Passport number.
    14. Date your passport was issued (day-month-year). This date is listed in your passport.
    15. Date that your passport expires as listed in your passport (day-month-year). This date must be at least one year from the date the visa application will be submitted to the consulate. 
    16. Enter US Department of State or the passport agency that issued your passport (NOT where you applied).
    17. Write your permanent address, email address, and phone number.
    18. Check 'No'. Check 'Yes' if you are not from the US but reside in the US.
    19. STUDENT.
    20. Main purpose of the journey: Check 'Studies'.
    21. Provide your intended date of arrival in Spain (day-month-year). You may estimate your arrival date if you have not purchased a flight at the time of application for the visa.
    22. Check 'More Than Two'.
    23. Fundacion Ortega-Marañón, Callejón de San Justo, 45001 Toledo, SPAIN
    24. Complete only if you have previously received a Spanish student visa.
    25. Complete only if you have previously received a Spanish student visa.
    26. This section is not applicable. Leave blank.
    27. This section is not applicable. Leave blank.
    28. Data of the educational establishment or research centre in case of applying for a student or research visa
      1. Name of the educational establishment or research centre~ Fundación Jose Ortega-Marañón
      2. Postal address of educational establishment or research centre~ Estudios Internacionales, Fundacion Ortega-Marañón, Callejón de San Justo, 45001 Toledo, SPAIN
      3. Telephone number of educational establishment or research centre~ 011.34.925.28.49.02
      4. Email of educational establishment or research centre~ yukiko.okazaki@fogm.es
      5. Intended starting date for studies or research~ provide the start date of the Toledo program (day-month-year)
      6. Intended finishing date for studies or research~ provide the end date of the Toledo program (day-month-year)
      7. The remainder of this section is not applicable to you.
    29. Current address and today's date (day-month-year).
    30. Your signature.
  13. Program Contact

    For further information or questions about this program, send an email to

    Amy Garwood-Diaz or call at 612.624.1537.

  14. Contact Program Alum

    Contact our Program Assistant to gain a peer's perspective: 

    Marni Kaiser is a Program Assistant for the Study & Intern in Toledo program. She is a senior majoring in Psychology and Spanish. She was a participant on the Toledo program in Spring of 2019. In Toledo, she interned at a school working with the speech pathologist and special education teachers. The breathtaking views were her favorite part about Toledo. She recommends that future participants embrace being uncomfortable while abroad, but also know that asking for help is perfectly acceptable and encouraged. 

    Allie Guidish is a Program Assistant for the Study & Intern in Toledo program. She is a senior majoring in Mathematics and Spanish Studies with a minor in Racial Justice in Urban Schooling, and is a part of DirecTrack to Teaching, a program for students interested in becoming educators. She was in Toledo as a program participant in Fall 2018, and while there she lived with a host family and volunteered at a local elementary school. Allie loves Toledo because of its cobblestone streets, picturesque views, and authentic Spanish culture. Her advice to future students is: "Trust the process! Studying abroad is a rollercoaster, but one that is so worth it. Your time abroad will make the world feel both larger and smaller, in the best way possible."

    Tyra Ramsey is the Program Assistant for the Study & Intern in Toledo program. She is a senior majoring in Theatre Arts with a Spanish Studies minor.  She was a participant of the program in Summer 2019.  While abroad, she worked in the library in the residence hall furthering and broadening her speaking and writing skills.  Her favorite thing about Toledo was all of the locals that she came to know and the strong community and support system there.  Her advice to future students:  "You are so much braver than you think you are.  Make new friends.  Try new food.  Adapt to your surroundings.  And please speak spanish!"