City of Buenos Aires, Argentina

Study Abroad in Buenos Aires

  1. Program Details

    Explore the vibrant, cosmopolitan atmosphere of Buenos Aires, a city of 15.5 million porteños. Focus on intensive Spanish, business, global studies, psychology, or more to expand your Argentine knowledge beyond tango and fútbol.

    Location Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Term Academic Year, Fall Semester, May Session, Spring Semester, Summer Session, Winter Break
    Housing Homestay
    Credit Type Resident Credit
    Sponsor Learning Abroad Center

    Program Eligibility

    GPA 2.5
    Student Type UofM Students, Non UofM Students
    Student Year Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors
    Language No language prerequisite for semester or summer terms, 2 semesters of college-level Spanish required for winter break
  2.  
  3. About Study Abroad in Buenos Aires

    The elegance of Europe and the spirit of South America live side by side in Buenos Aires. Founded by immigrants along the shores of the Rio de la Plata, Buenos Aires built its identity on Spanish, Italian, and French influences, which appear in the grand boulevards, expansive parks, and magnificent architecture. While exploring the city's neighborhoods, visit the small colored houses of La Boca and experience the popular tango that lives in San Telmo streets. Nearly 40 percent of the Argentine population lives in the capital, making this "Paris of the Americas" a city of more than 14 million.

    The program is offered jointly by the Fundación José Ortega y Gasset and the Learning Abroad Center. Located in the heart of downtown Buenos Aires, the Fundación is located in one of Argentina's most elegant and prestigious buildings, where you will learn and experience Spanish language and culture. A diverse faculty brings a wealth of knowledge to the classroom. Extracurricular activities—sampling food, reading literature, experiencing music and dance—increase your understanding of Argentine culture.

    For help deciding between Spanish language options, consult the Spanish Language Programs Comparison Chart (PDF).

    Housing & Meals

    Homestay

    All students on both the semester and summer programs will live with a local host family. Many students cite this as one of the highlights of their experience, since it offers you a unique opportunity to connect with the culture, practice your Spanish and observe daily life in Argentina. 

    Most families have hosted students in the past and are committed to helping ease your transition into city life.  

    As in the US, families in Argentina are diverse, and vary greatly in terms of the composition and ages of family members. You will have an opportunity to express some basic preferences about the type of family you would like to be placed with as part of the application process. About half of families are able to accommodate two or more students, so you may be placed with another student from the program.

    Host family homes are scattered throughout the city, and typical commute times range from 30 - 60 minutes, including some combination of public transportation (bus, subway) and walking. 

    Meals

    Host families will provide you with breakfast and dinner each day as part of the program. You will be responsible for providing your own lunch. There are several inexpensive places to eat near the classroom building.

    Excursions

    Several planned excursions are included in the cost of the program. These tours and day trips show the city and country's historical and cultural highlights. Excursions are subject to change each term. Previous destinations have included:

    Buenos Aires city tour

    3-hour guided tour of Buenos Aires 

    Tigre

    Half-day tour to Tigre, a town just 17 miles north of Buenos Aires on the Tigre River delta. Take a boat ride, visit the artisan market, and have free time to explore the city.

    Lujan

    Full-day excursion to this city of pilgrimage within the province of Buenos Aires. Visit the Bascilica of Lujan, home to the Virgin of Lujan, the patroness of Argentina, as well as the central square. Visit the estancia that was home to famous Argentine writer Esteban Echeverría when he was fleeing the dictatorship of Juan Manuael de Rosas.

    Areco

    Full-day excursion to this traditional Argentine town just a few hours outside of Buenos Aires. Tour an estancia (ranch), enjoy asado (Argentine barbeque), and watch traditional dancing as well as gauchos on horseback performing traditional competitions and games. Visit San Antonia de Areco and tour the site of the Día de la Tradición festivities, which take place each November.

    Colonia, Uruguay

    Overnight excursion. Cross the Rio de la Plata by ferry and explore this historic, picturesque town. The excursion includes a city tour, breakfast, lunch, a cultural scavenger hunt and accommodation at a local hotel.

    Flight

    The Learning Abroad Center works with Village Travel, a local travel agency, to arrange a coordinated flight for program participants. The flight is optional, and is arranged for those who want to fly with other program participants. Group flight information is typically available by the program application deadline, if not before.

    Ground transportation from the Ministro Pistarini International Airport (airport code: EZE) into Buenos Aires is provided by our partner organization and the cost is included in the program fee. The transportation schedule aligns with the group flight arrival time. Our partner organization comes to the airport once to collect everyone.

    Therefore, you can either book a ticket on the coordinated group flight, or book a flight independently that arrives prior to the group flight's arrival. If you arrive late and miss the group, you may be responsible for arranging and paying for your own transportation into the city.

    For immigration purposes, you should purchase a round-trip ticket, since you must be able to show your entry and exit dates from Argentina.

    Learning Outcomes

    • Strengthen Spanish language skills
    • Deepen cross-cultural understanding through interaction with local communities, host families, and in classes
    • Gain a new perspective on Argentina and Latin America through academic disciplines
    • Increase independence and self-reliance through learning to navigate a new environment

    Faculty & Staff

    Enjoy individual attention from native Argentine faculty chosen by the Fundación José Ortega y Gasset. All faculty are specialists in their academic fields and in the field of teaching foreign students. Many are also instructors at local universities.

    About the Learning Abroad Center

    Learning Abroad Center programs are:

    • Affordable: our programs are cost effective.
    • Academically strong: many programs have strong University of Minnesota departmental support and offer pre-approved courses for many majors.
    • Culturally rich: regardless of the program you choose, you will have the opportunity to immerse yourself in the local culture.
    • Expertly managed: our staff in Minnesota and abroad are trained professionals and are always available to answer your questions from extensive pre-departure advising and online orientations to reentry programming. Your safety and well-being are paramount, and we work hard to ensure you have a rewarding and safe experience abroad.
  4. Program Structure

    Program Type Study Abroad Center
    Program Level 1000–3000 level courses
    Courseload

    Students are required to maintain a minimum enrollment of 13 credits per semester or maintain the minimum credit enrollment determined by their study abroad program, whichever is greater.

    Semester

    A mix of English or Spanish-taught courses (depending on proficiency) for a total of 13–18 credits

    Winter Break

    1 course for 4 or 5 credits

    May, Summer

    1 Spanish-taught course during each 3-week session for a total of 3-5 credits per session 

    Coursework

    View the full course list for this program.

    Semester Program

    Choose from 1000 to 3000-level Spanish-taught courses, elective courses taught in English, and a service-learning course. Students who have not completed at least four semesters of college-level Spanish (or who do not have equivalent proficiency) will be required to enroll in at least one intensive Spanish course (two is recommended) at the appropriate level. 

    ARGN 1001-3015 are taught in a 7-week intensive format such that semester students can complete two levels of Spanish in one semester.

    May & Summer Program

    Choose one Spanish-taught course per three-week session for a total of 3–5 credits per session. English-taught courses are not available during May/Summer.

    Winter Break Program

    Complete either ARGN 1003ARGN 1004 or ARGN 3015 during this 3-week term for a total of 4-5 credits

    Course Options

    Select the term and, where applicable, the number of semesters (or equivalent) of language instruction you will have completed by the time you start the program.

    Term Take the Following

    May & Summer

    Semesters of Spanish completed

    One

    3-Week Session

    6-Week Session

    Two

    3-Week Session

    6-Week Session

    Three

    3-Week Session

    6-Week Session

    Four

    3-Week Session

    6-Week Session

    Semester

    Semesters of Spanish completed

    Zero

    Take the Following Courses
    ARGN 1001: Beginning Spanish I
    ARGN 1002: Beginning Spanish II
    1–3 Topics courses taught in English (excluding Service Learning course)

    One

    ARGN 1002: Beginning Spanish II
    ARGN 1003: Intermediate Spanish III
    1–3 Topics courses taught in English (excluding Service Learning course)

    Two

    ARGN 1003: Intermediate Spanish III
    ARGN 1004: Intermediate Spanish IV
    1–3 Topics courses taught in English (excluding Service Learning course)

    Three

    ARGN 1004: Intermediate Spanish IV
    and

    Choose 3–4 Spanish or English-taught Courses

    Four +

    Any 4–6 courses that total at least 13 credits

    Winter Break

    Semesters of Spanish Completed

    Two

    Three

    Four

  5. Courses Taught in Spanish

    Intensive Spanish Language Courses

    Beginning Spanish I
    ARGN 1001
    Fall, Spring
    5 Credits

    First-semester, college-level Spanish. Develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Some cultural readings are included. This course is intended for participants with little or no prior Spanish language instruction.

    Syllabus for Beginning Spanish I Spanish ver. (PDF)

    Syllabus for Beginning Spanish I English ver. (PDF)

    Alternate Second-Semester Spanish
    ARGN 1022
    May Session Only
    5 Credits

    Brief review of material from first-semester, college-level Spanish followed by second-semester, college-level Spanish. Develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Some cultural readings are included. This class is designed to develop and strengthen further the language skills acquired in Spanish I.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 1001, or equivalent, with a C- or better

    Syllabus for Alternate Second-Semester Spanish Spanish ver. (PDF)

    Syllabus for Alternate Second-Semester Spanish English ver. (PDF)

    Beginning Spanish II
    ARGN 1002
    Fall, Spring
    5 Credits

    Second-semester, college-level Spanish. Develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Some cultural readings are included. This class is designed to develop and strengthen further the language skills acquired in Spanish I.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 1001, or equivalent, with a C- or better

    Syllabus for Beginning Spanish II Spanish ver. (PDF)

    Syllabus for Beginning Spanish II English ver. (PDF)

    Intermediate Spanish III
    ARGN 1003
    Fall, Winter Break, Spring, May, Summer
    5 Credits

    Third-semester, college-level Spanish. Further improve conversation and comprehension proficiency. Develop reading and writing skills through literary analysis and grammar review. This class is designed to develop and strengthen further the language skills acquired in Spanish II.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 1002, or equivalent, with a C- or better

    Syllabus for Intermediate Spanish III Spanish ver. (PDF)

    Syllabus for Intermediate Spanish III English ver. (PDF)

    Intermediate Spanish IV
    ARGN 1004
    Fall, Winter Break, Spring, May, Summer
    5 Credits

    Fourth-semester, college-level Spanish. Further improve conversation and comprehension proficiency. Develop reading and writing skills through literary analysis and grammar review. This class is designed to develop and strengthen further the language skills acquired in Spanish III.

    Syllabus for Intermediate Spanish IV Spanish ver. (PDF)

    Syllabus for Intermediate Spanish IV English ver. (PDF)

    Spanish Composition & Communication
    ARGN 3015W
    Fall, Winter Break, Spring, Summer
    4 Credits

    Fifth-semester, college-level Spanish. This course seeks to integrate the student's ability to write, speak, read, and understand modern Spanish at a level that is expected of majors and minors. Students generate a series of creative and original compositions and read a variety of texts from both Spain and Latin America. The class employs diverse learning techniques—grammar review, audio tape exercises, paired work, small group work, all class discussions, oral presentations, peer editing, process writing—to provide students with the appropriate opportunities to enhance their language skills as they learn academic content through the active use of the Spanish language. This class is designed to develop and strengthen further the language skills acquired in Spanish IV.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 1004, or equivalent, with a C- or better

    Syllabus for Spanish Composition & Communication Spanish ver. (PDF)

    Syllabus for Spanish Composition & Communication English ver. (PDF)

    Electives Taught in Spanish

    Buenos Aires: City of the Arts
    ARGN 3011
    Fall, Spring, May, Summer (6 wks)
    3 Credits

    This course focuses on the art and architecture of Argentina. Learn about the different artistic movements in the country and visit museums, private art collections, and public monuments. The city becomes your classroom. At the same time, get a broader perspective of world art that serves as a background for a better understanding of the art and architectural scene in Argentina throughout the past 300 years.

    Approved for the Arts and Humanities core and the Global Perspectives theme.
    Spanish Department Equivalent: SPAN 3510

    Syllabus for Buenos Aires: City of the Arts Spanish ver. (PDF)

    Colloquial Spanish
    ARGN 3001
    Fall, Spring, May session
    3 Credits

    This upper-level elective course gives students an understanding of everyday Spanish as spoken by native speakers. It is designed to help students recognize distinct varieties of spoken Spanish.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 1004, or equivalent, with a C- or better

    May count as a Spanish elective for Spanish Studies Majors and Minors as an elective without a Critical Analysis prerequisite.

    Syllabus for Colloquial Spanish Spanish ver. (PDF)

    Syllabus for Colloquial Spanish English ver. (PDF)

    Argentina: Stereotypes & Identity
    ARGN 3009
    Fall, Winter Break, Spring, May
    3 Credits

    This course provides an intercultural perspective of Argentina: how others see or perceive Argentines and how Argentines perceive themselves through literature, humor, art, music, and history. Throughout this course students will go beyond the notion of "stereotype" to attempt to gain a better understanding of Argentine identity.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 1004, or equivalent, with a C- or better

    Approved for the Arts and Humanities core and the Global Perspectives theme
    Spanish Department Equivalent: SPAN 3510

    Syllabus for Argentina: Stereotypes & Identity Spanish ver. (PDF)

    Syllabus for Argentina: Stereotypes & Identity English ver. (PDF)

    Introduction to the Study of Hispanic Literatures
    ARGN 3104W
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    3 Credits

    The aim of this course is to offer an introduction to Hispanic prose, poetry, and drama. In this intensive writing course, students read samples of the best and most renowned literary texts written in Spanish and at the same time develop strategies to improve their formal (academic) writing by articulating their opinions and interpreting the text read in class.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 1004, or equivalent, with a C- or better

    Approved for the Literature core, Global Perspectives theme, and Writing Intensive requirement
    Spanish Department Equivalent: SPAN 3104W

    Syllabus for Introduction to the Study of Hispanic Literatures Spanish ver. (PDF)

    Syllabus for Introduction to the Study of Hispanic Literatures English ver. (PDF)

    Courses Taught in English

    Psychology

    Cross-Cultural Psychology
    ARGN 3301
    Fall, Spring
    3 Credits
    This course's aim is to understand how cultural factors influence human behavior and development. Additionally, the interaction between different cultures and how to solve the difficulties that may arise during the acculturation process may be discussed. The course also studies the vision and treatment of mental disorders in different cultures, especially the differences and similarities between Argentine and North American cultures. Mental Health systems of both countries will be also analyzed and compared.
     
    The Paradox of Mental Health
    ARGN 3012
    Fall, Spring
    3 Credits
    This course looks at the biological basis for mental health, applying basic concepts of neurobiology. It explores the causal mechanisms of various mental health issues from autism to anxiety. The course will compare Argentina’s and the United States’ approaches to mental health, exploring the relationship between culture and mental health (e.g., “culture-bound syndromes”) over time. In addition, the course will compare the use of therapy versus pharmacological approaches in treating mental illness, looking at the medicalization of mental health in Argentina as compared to the United States.
     

    Global Studies—Latin American Courses

    Internships in Argentina
    ARGN 3xxx
    Fall, Spring
    3 Credits

    The Buenos Aires internship course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to become more knowledgeable regarding the local culture, organizational cultures, and the professional environment.

    Approved for Social Science core and Global Perspectives theme

    Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 1004, four semesters of college-level Spanish, or equivalent proficiency

    Syllabus for Internships in Argentina (PDF)

    Politics & Society in Latin America
    ARGN 3003
    Fall, Spring
    3 Credits

    Take part in a comparative analysis of the social and political structures of Argentina and Latin America in the 20th Century. 

    Approved for Social Science core and Global Perspectives theme

    Syllabus for Politics & Society in Latin America (PDF)

    Buenos Aires: City of the Arts
    ARGN 3005
    Fall, Spring
    3 Credits

    This course focuses on the art and architecture of Argentina. Learn about the different artistic movements in the country and visit museums, private art collections, and public monuments. The city becomes your classroom. At the same time, get a broader perspective of world art that serves as a background for a better understanding of the art and architectural scene in Argentina throughout the past 300 years.

    Approved for the Arts and Humanities core and the Global Perspectives theme

    Syllabus for Buenos Aires: City of the Arts (PDF)

    Topics in Argentine History
    ARGN 3006
    Fall, Spring
    3 Credits

    Study Argentina's history. Main topics include the legacy of Peron, the army in politics and government, the return of democracy, and current events.

    Approved for the Historical Perspectives core and the Global Perspectives theme

    Syllabus for Topics in Argentine History (PDF)

    Latin American Literature & Cinema
    ARGN 3008
    Fall, Spring
    3 Credits

    Study Argentine and Latin American literature and cinema of the past 3 decades. This course explores cinematic and literary representations of Argentina and Latin America, focusing on cinema and literature’s common capacity to enact and depict national identities through storytelling and recurrent topics.

    Approved for the Literature core and the Global Perspectives theme

    Syllabus for Latin American Literature & Cinema (PDF)

    Service-Learning in Buenos Aires
    ARGN 3640
    Fall, Spring
    3 Credits

    Service-Learning in Buenos Aires emphasizes learning outside the classroom and reflection and critical thinking within the classroom to understand communities and social change. Community service-learning means engagement in the community and learning as the highest priority. The aim of this course is that students are able to make connections between what is learned in the classroom and what is observed outside the classroom, to test theories and research against social realities and vice versa.

    Approved for the Civic Life and Ethics core and the Global Perspectives theme

    Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 1003, three semesters of college-level Spanish, or equivalent

    Business

    International Marketing
    ARGN 3752
    Fall, Spring
    3 Credits

    The student will be encouraged to perceive the role of a global marketing manager and to make decisions that could affect the outcome of a global marketing plan. This includes the international marketing environment and the international marketing mix, namely product, pricing, distribution, and promotion, as well as emerging issues in international trade such as trading blocs, trade barriers, and the standardization-versus-customization dilemma. A perspective on marketing in Argentina will be provided within this course.

    Approved for Global Perspectives theme
    This course has been pre-approved for elective credit by Carlson School of Management. Check with your adviser to see how this course fits within your academic plan

    Syllabus for International Marketing (PDF)

    The Global Economy
    ARGN 4621
    Fall, Spring
    3 Credits

    This course provides an in-depth understanding of international finance. Macro and micro views are discussed, combining issues for policymakers, managers of multinational corporations, and international investors. The course also provides insight in issues relating to emerging markets finance.

    Approved for Global Perspectives theme
    This course has been pre-approved for elective credit by Carlson School of Management. Check with your adviser to see how this course fits within your academic plan.

    Syllabus for The Global Economy (PDF)

    Latin American Economy: The Argentine Perspective
    ARGN 3004
    Fall, Spring
    3 Credits

    Examine privatization, industrialization, and economic reforms in Latin America and Argentina. This course looks at inflation, structural change, poverty, and changes in the external sector and rural sector. 
    Approved for Social Science core and Global Perspectives theme

    Syllabus for Latin American Economy: The Argentine Perspective (PDF)

    Optional Online Course

    Global Identity
    OLPD 3330
    Online, optional
    1 credit
    Global Identity: Connecting Your International Experience with Your Future is an optional 1-credit online course that helps you process your international experience and apply what you've learned upon your return.  Global Identity gives you the opportunity to work individually with a trained cultural mentor, helping you articulate your newly acquired skills and differentiating you from your peers.

    This course is offered at no additional cost on programs six weeks or longer. The Learning Abroad Center will email out registration instructions, or you may contact a program team member.

    Syllabus for Global Identity (PDF)

  6. Service Learning

    Service-Learning in Buenos Aires—ARGN 3640

    • Fall & Spring
    • 3 Credits
    • *Prerequisite = SPAN 1003

    This course emphasizes learning outside the classroom and reflection and critical thinking within the classroom to understand communities and social change. Community service-learning means engagement in the community and learning as the highest priority. The aim of this course is that you are able to make connections between what is learned in the classroom and what is observed outside the classroom, to test theories and research against social realities and vice versa. Fulfill your on-site service-learning through nongovernmental organizations and other community service organizations devoted to helping children and adults who do not have access to basic rights such as education, health, or a home. Learn about impoverished urban areas and the situation of immigrants from border countries and groups at high risk (women, children, seniors). Each week, you will spend an hour and a half in class and 2 to 3 hours at your placement site.

    Approved for the Civic Life and Ethics core and the Global Perspectives theme

    Past internship placements have included:

    • Assisting at a health center
    • Working with children and young people with AIDS/HIV
    • Tutoring children in elementary school
    • Cooking meals, giving English lessons, or playing sports with children at a community center
    • Helping inmates at a mental health hospital with vegetable garden
    • Working at a children's home

    Syllabus for Service Learning in Buenos Aires (PDF)

    Internships

    Internships in Buenos Aires —ARGN 3xxx

    • Fall & Spring
    • 3 credits
    • Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 1004, four semesters of college-level Spanish, or equivalent proficiency

    The Buenos Aires internship course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to become more knowledgeable regarding the local culture, organizational cultures, and the professional environment. Through practical internship experiences as well as readings, discussions, and written assignments, students will deepen their understanding of the host country’s cultural context and critically examine their own worldview.  

    The course is designed to guide students in the internship experience and create a foundation for a successful professional career. In addition to gaining a cross-cultural comparative view on work, the topics and assignments will deepen students’ insights about themselves, professional expectations, and being successful in the workplace. Students are expected to make a valuable contribution to the internship site through the completion of major projects or tasks.

    This course focuses on themes students are expected to develop and enhance over the course of the semester through class seminars and on-the-job experience, particularly characteristics of work dynamics in Argentina; work relations, work protocol, and hierarchy; differences between Argentina and the US, notions of leadership in Argentina, and local cultural traits that are unique to the country; and multiculturalism, age, gender, and communication in the workplace.

    Placements are currently available in the following areas, with the hope to expand in the future:

    • Art/visual arts
    • Business
    • Non-profits
    • Research/statistics

    Syllabus for Internships in Buenos Aires (PDF)

  7. Dates & Deadlines

    Submit the online application and complete the assigned application checklist according to the appropriate deadline:
    Program Term App Open Date Deadline*
    Fall 2019 Dec 1 Apr 1
    Depart US Aug 18
    Arrive in Buenos Aires Aug 19
    Orientation, grammar workshops & core course begin Aug 20
    Regular classes begin Aug 26
    Fall Break Oct 11 – 20
    Depart Buenos Aires Oct 11
    Last day of classes Dec 5
    Depart Buenos Aires Dec 6
    Arrive in US Dec 7
    Winter Break 2019-2020 May 1 Oct 22
    US Departure Dec 28
    Argentina Arrival Dec 29
    Classes begin Dec 30
    Argentina Departure Jan 18
    US Arrival Jan 19
    Spring 2020 May 1 Nov 1
    US Departure Jan 19
    Argentina arrival Jan 20
    Orientation week/core course begins Jan 20 – 24
    Regular classes begin Jan 27
    Spring break Mar 13 – 22
    Argentina departure May 8
    US arrival May 9
    May 2020 Aug 1 Mar 15
    US Departure Saturday May 16
    Argentina arrival Sunday May 17
    Classes begin Monday May 18
    Argentina departure Saturday Jun 6
    US arrival Sunday Jun 7
    Summer 2020 Aug 1 Mar 15
    US Departure Saturday Jun 6
    Argentina arrival Sunday Jun 7
    Classes begin Monday Jun 8
    Argentina departure Saturday Jun 27
    US arrival Sunday Jun 28
    May + Summer 2020 Aug 1 Mar 15
    US departure Saturday May 16
    Argentina arrival Sunday May 17
    Classes begin Monday May 18
    Argentina departure Saturday Jun 27
    US arrival Sunday Jun 28

    *Program dates are subject to change. Contact the LAC for verification of dates before purchasing your airfare.
    **If the deadline falls on a weekend, submit your materials on the following business day.

    Orientation Dates & Locations

    Orientation will be conducted in 2 parts: an online orientation, which is mandatory for all students, and an in-person, program-specific session. You will receive more information about the online orientation via email. Failure to complete the online orientation will impact your ability to go abroad.

    See below for tentative dates and times for your in-person session. You will be notified of the official date and time via email. Participants will receive applicable orientation materials via email approximately 1 week prior to the in-person session.

    Term Abroad Date/Time Location
    Winter Break and Spring 2020 Thursday, November 21, 2019, 3:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m. Blegen Hall 425
  8. Fees for Study Abroad in Buenos Aires

    University of Minnesota participants pay the program fee instead of on-campus tuition and fees for the term they are abroad.

    Academic Year 2019-20

    Standard Program

    Internship Option

    Fall 2019

    Standard Program

    Internship Option

    Winter Break 2019-20

    Homestay

    Spring 2020

    Homestay

    Internship Option

    May or Summer 2019: 3-week

    Homestay

    May or Summer 2019: 6-week

    Homestay

    If you do not see a budget estimate for the term you intend to go abroad, the fee has not yet been finalized. We strive to post fees for this program at least 30 days prior to the application deadline. The Learning Abroad Center will delay the posting of some fees until enrollments, inflation and exchange rates are determined. Note the average increase in fees will be 3–10%. Program fees are based on estimates and may change depending on international economic factors.

    Fees or tuition from home institutions may be added to or differ from the University of Minnesota Learning Abroad Center fees listed on this page.

    Billing & Payments

    Visit Billing for information about the billing process for application fees, deposits, and program fees.

    Financial Aid & Scholarships

    Visit Financial Information for information on using financial aid and scholarships for study abroad.

    Bridging Loan

    Bridging Loan, a no-interest/no-fees loan that funds the upfront deposit and flights costs, is available for this program for eligible students.

    Cancellation Policy

    Before you apply to or confirm your participation on this program, review the Learning Abroad Center's Cancellation Policy to inform yourself of the timeline and financial obligations for canceling.
  9. Prepare

    Complete pre-application advising.

    Be aware: All programs require a $50 application fee. This fee will be charged to your student account upon submission of an online application.

    To complete the online application for this program, you will need to select or provide the following information on the online application:

    Center Name TC Learning Abroad Ctr
    Education Abroad Term See Program Dates for term options
    Program Name Study Abroad in Buenos Aires
    Track Name See Program Dates for track options
    Country Argentina

    Submit

    University of Minnesota Student—apply

    Use your University of Minnesota internet ID and password to log into the Education Abroad application system. Your student account will be charged a $50 application fee.

    Non-University of Minnesota Student—apply

    Once you submit your application, Learning Abroad Center staff will create a University of Minnesota student internet account for you. You will use this account to access the Education Abroad Application System, and other University of Minnesota services. You will be charged a $50 application fee for this program.

    Our staff will contact you within 2–3 business days with your internet account information, and additional application instructions.

    Complete

    After you submit your application, you will receive an email notification confirming that your application was received. Submitted applications are assigned an application checklist, which will include the following items:

    • Application Essay
    • Course Selection Form
    • Transcript (Non-UofM students only)
    • Home Institution Nomination (Non-UofM students only)
    • Internship application (in English, Internship students only)
    • Resumé (in English, Internship students only)

    Detailed descriptions and instructions for submitting each checklist item are included on the application checklist assigned to you.

    If you do not meet the GPA requirement for this program you will be required to submit two additional application items—the Low GPA Essay and Special Circumstances Recommendation. Both items will be added to your checklist after you start your application, and you will be notified when they have been added.

    Application Review Process

    After your application checklist is complete, your application is reviewed by our program team. You will be notified of an acceptance decision by email. If accepted, you will be assigned a confirmation checklist, which you will complete to confirm your participation in the program. If you decide not to continue with the application process, log into the online application system and submit a Cancel Request.

  10. Program Contact

    For further information or questions about this program, send an email to

    Molly Micheels or call at 612.624.3949.

  11. Contact Program Alum

    Below is a list of additional students who participated in past program sessions. They are ready and willing to answer your questions about this program. Feel free to contact them during your decision-making process or anytime during your pre-departure preparation to get a student perspective.

    May/Summer 2019

    • Brittany J.: Family Social Science major, Spanish studies minor. 
    • Arianna B.:  Global Studies major,  Spanish and Sustainability
      minor.
    • Daniel C.:  Global Studies and Political Science majors, 
      Spanish minor.
    •  

    Winter Break 2018-19

    • Carina H.: International Business major (SPAN 1004)

    Fall 2018

    • Brian T.: Global Studies major, Spanish minor
    • Kelsey M.: Nutrition and Spanish Studies majors
    • Anne T.: Journalism and Spanish Studies majors
    • Julia D.: Journalism major, GWSS and Spanish minors
    • Avraham "Avi" S.: History and Jewish Studies majors