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University Study in Ireland—Limerick: Site Access Summary

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Learn about University Study in Ireland: University of Limerick.

Attitudinal

In 2006, Insight Statistical Consulting undertook a survey commissioned by the National Disability Authority on public attitudes toward people with disabilities in the Republic of Ireland.

Here are a few highlights from the full results:

Just over six-in-ten respondents (61%) agreed that it is society, which disables people by creating barriers and only 45% of respondents thought people with disabilities were treated fairly in Irish society. People that had a disability were more likely to agree that it is society, which disables people by creating barriers. Four-fifths of respondents (80%) believed there were occasions or circumstances when it was all right to treat people with disabilities more favourably than others. However, regardless of the disability, more than half of respondents agreed that people with disabilities are not able to participate fully in life.

Just over half (52%) of respondents thought people with disabilities did not receive equal opportunities in terms of education. There was not a significant difference in response to this question regardless of presence or absence of a disability by the respondent. When asked should children with disabilities attend the same schools as children without disabilities the highest level of acceptance was for those that had physical disabilities with three-quarters of respondents (75%) agreeing that they should attend the same schools as children without disabilities. The lowest level of acceptance was for mental health difficulties with only 36% of respondents agreeing that they should be in the same schools as children without disabilities. Respondents that had a disability were more likely to agree that people with intellectual or learning, physical or visual/hearing disability should be in the same school as other children.

Mental health difficulty was also the only disability category that had a relatively high level of objection to having children with that disability in the same class as non-disabled children. Just over one-in-five respondents (21%) said they would object. Respondents that had a disability themselves were less likely to object to children with mental health difficulties being in the same class as their child with 15% objecting compared to 21% of people with no disability.

Six-in-ten respondents (61%) thought buildings and public facilities in Ireland are not adequately accessible for people with disabilities. People that had a disability were more likely to have the opinion that buildings and public facilities in Ireland are not adequately accessible for people with disabilities. Nearly nine-in-ten respondents (87%) agreed that in general, access to buildings and public facilities for people with disabilities has improved in the last five years. However, 92% of respondents agreed that more could be done to meet the needs of people with disabilities regarding access to buildings and public facilities. Again people with disabilities were more likely than others to agree that more could be done regarding access to buildings and public facilities.

The Disability Act of 2005, a keystone of Ireland’s National Disability Strategy, provided for an assessment of the needs of people with disabilities; improve access to public building, services, and information; allow for the proactive hiring of people with disabilities.

In 2006, Toward 2016, a ten-year plan and “social partnership agreement” was instituted, which included provisions to improve attitudes toward and services for people with disabilities. Under this new plan, the Republic of Ireland is committed to “….an Ireland where people with disabilities have, to the greatest extent possible, the opportunity to live a full life with their families and as part of their local community, free from discrimination.” Towards 2016 (p.66) Toward 2016 outlines the following five key goals:

Classroom and Academics

Disability Support Services supports international students. Some services are  free for international students. However, you may have to pay for some specific support or services, such as personal note taking or sign language interpreting.  It is important that you check in advance to ensure DSS is able to meet your specific requirements. Be sure that the University can provide you with the type and level of support you are used to and that the Alternative Examination Arrangements meet your particular requirements. It is also important to bring with you full documentation outlining any learning support needs as well as any other relevant medical documentation. If you are reliant on technology you should check that your technology is compatible with that used in Irelandand that back-up or repairers are available. If you take medication, check that it is available in Ireland.

If you have any questions, contact Disability Services Office

All information provided to the Disability Resource Center is confidential and will not be released without a student’s express permission. If a student is an international student there MAY be charges for some forms of support services. Intending students need to check in advance with the University of Limerick

Services provided include:

Excursions and Field Trips

Excursions and field trips depend on individual instructors and classes. Students should talk with their instructors and DSS staff as soon as possible to determine appropriate accommodations.

Housing and Food Services

All of the villages on campus are accessible and have adapted rooms for students with disabilities. For more information, see Campus Life Services.

It is vital that students book early and outline their needs to the accommodations office. As part of the inclusive measures provided by the university there is a Disability Support Services accessible bus available to bring students to and from the villages.

Technology

Available adaptive technology includes:

Library Services

All libraries at the university are wheelchair accessible. Also, a library assistant can be available to retrieve resources for students (contact DSS for more information). See Visiting UL Library for more information about accessibility.

Transportation

As part of the inclusive measures provided by the university there is a Disability Services accessible bus available to bring students to and from the villages.

If you wish to avail of this service please arrange a meeting with the Disability Officer.

Additional Comments

Additional Comments

From Disability Support Services:

The University of Limerick is an equal opportunities institution and welcomes applications from a diverse range of under-represented groups including people with disabilities. The University's Disability policy is designed to promote and facilitate entry to and participation in the academic programmes and the student life of the University by people with disabilities.
The University of Limerick is committed to ensuring that people with disability are treated in a fair and inclusive manner and given the opportunity to achieve their educational goals  in an inclusive learning environment.  In providing for specific needs, the university will have particular regard for the human dignity, potential and independence of each individual and the necessity for confidentiality.